Podcast

Shannon Shy – Overcoming OCD

In episode 94 I interviewed Shannon Shy. Shannon is the president of the board of directors for the IOCDF and an OCD peer support specialist. He is also an attorney for the department of the U.S. Navy, a retired Marine Corps lieutenant colonel, and the author of two books about obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), “It’ll be Okay”: How I Kept OCD from Ruining My Life, and Hope Is on Your Side: A Motivational Journal for Those Affected OCD.

Shannon Shy

In this episode I chat with Shannon about his OCD story, the power of a single choice, developing a recovery strategy, peer support, the “hope” and “motivation” questions, welcoming triggers as an opportunity to get better, taking daily action in recovery, being consistent and persistent, not focusing on measuring progress so much, finding a position of calm, and learning to live to the fullest. Enjoy!


podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

You can also listen on Android and over devices through most podcast apps, such as Stitcher.

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OCD

I’m standing. I’m living.

I write this to tell My story. To let others know they are not alone.

When I was young I’m not sure of the age but little. I used to kiss everyone of my beanie baby animals at night. It sounds sweet right? Well it wasn’t for me– I would kiss each one the get into bed. After I’d get into bed I would wonder did I really kiss each one? What if I didn’t- I would start to feel heavy in my chest and my body uneven. I would get up and kiss them all again (I had a lot), crawl back into bed. Sometimes I could be ok with just that but often times I would kiss them until my lips hurt and I was crying, or until someone in my family said to go to bed. I didn’t know what was wrong with me. I would wake up thinking it all was silly until I would do it again the next night. I remember certain rituals. Feeling like one of my fingers was “bad” I would have to touch something with my other finger Two times for every one time I did with my bad finger. I would get stuck in one place for so long touching back and forth. I’m unsure anyone noticed. Maybe they did. Maybe they worried or joked about how I was just a weird kid, maybe OCD wasn’t a topic back then. But I remember feeling stuck in my head a lot.

I was fine a lot of the time, no one would of noticed, as I am now pretty functional outwardly. My teenage years were hard. College harder. I had an eating disorder in high school that I can see now was based entirely on OCD. I would pick out certain foods and amounts that were ok to eat. If I didn’t eat them at a certain time of day or I ate more than allowed I would get panicked. Would I get very fat? Would everything fall apart? Everything about being a teenage girl seemed to revolve around my OCD. Much like when I was little I had a ritual every night of doing sit-ups. 100. But if I miscounted I thought I would start over. I see so clearly the color of the carpet in my bedroom, feeling dizzy, upset- thinking if I could only get through this it would be ok, I would feel even. College is when I finally realized what was wrong with me. I started having weird thoughts. Worried I would stab someone I loved with a knife at night. I would get physically ill over it. I’d tell my then boyfriend at the time. He was a good guy, he would laugh it off say it’s ok. I would tell him so much it felt like sweet relief to say something until I thought it again. I looked up these thoughts online— intrusive thoughts. A glitch in the brain. It helped me to know it didn’t mean I wanted to hurt someone, in fact it meant quite the opposite I was so sickened by my thoughts I couldn’t let them go. I went on Zoloft. It failed, I felt sick and zombie and fat. I always said I could get through anything by walking. And honestly I think I did. When I met my husband he use to say I was in my “hole” when I got down. I couldn’t get out he would say unless I went outside or got out of the house. God he pulled me out of that hole so many times. The man is a saint really, he doesn’t hear it enough. And he prob didn’t know when he married me that he would deal with my mental illness so heavily.

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OCD

Living with trichotillomania

Through these experiences, I want to be able to help others, including Native Americans

My battle with trichotillomania has been on and off since a young age. My earliest memory of the start was in elementary school in music class one day when my head began itching and I began pulling. In 7th grade, it definitely continued to get worse up through high school. I began being bullied in high school from it; called names, lost friends, and had little support. I even tried committing suicide. My family did not understand my situation, and instead they pushed me to stop through shame. I wanted to wear a wig in school but I felt discouraged, thinking I might be made fun of worse.

I am Native American and my family also had superstitious beliefs. My problem in their eyes was from having someone who was “witching” me. Their assumption was that someone from their cultural view was jealous and/or hated me, and somehow got a hold of my nails or hair and buried it in a graveyard making me crazy. My anxiety built from the bullying in school, pressure to stop. My nail biting had also gotten worse as well, people saying my fingers were gonna curl in where I couldn’t use them anymore.

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Podcast

Kimberley Quinlan – OCD and Eating Disorders

In episode 93 I interviewed Kimberley Quinlan. Kimberley is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist who treats people with OCD and related disorders, Eating Disorders and Body Focused Repetitive Disorders. She runs her own podcast called Your Anxiety Toolkit. Kimberley also trained at the OCD centre of Los Angeles, and later became the clinical director.

Kimberley Quinlan

In this episode I chat with Kimberley about eating disorders and OCD. We discuss what is an eating disorder, treatments for eating disorders, learning to observe thoughts, applying radical acceptance, ARFID and orthorexia, fear of foods, creating a healthy relationship with food, compassion, finding a support team, and the body positivity movement. Enjoy!


podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

You can also listen on Android and over devices through most podcast apps, such as Stitcher.

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Podcast

Kimberley Quinlan – Badass Radical Acceptance for OCD

In episode 92 I interviewed Kimberley Quinlan. Kimberley is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist who treats people with OCD and related disorders, Eating Disorders and Body Focused Repetitive Disorders. She runs her own podcast called Your Anxiety Toolkit. Kimberley also trained at the OCD centre of Los Angeles, and later became the clinical director.

Kimberley Quinlan

In this episode I chat with Kimberley about radical acceptance. We discuss what is radical acceptance, accepting thoughts doesn’t mean agreeing with them, accepting the thought not the content of the thought, “as it is”, difference between pain and suffering, the second arrow story, how radical acceptance is useful for OCD recovery, practice radically accepting in non-OCD areas to build up the skill, curiosity, the yes meditation, and the loving yourself. Enjoy!


podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

You can also listen on Android and over devices through most podcast apps, such as Stitcher.

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Podcast

Aneela Kumar – Trichotillomania and the Keen Smart Bracelet

In episode 91 I interviewed Aneela Kumar. Aneela is the inspiration for HabitAware. The company behind “Keen” a smart bracelet that gently vibrates when you start to pick, pull or bite, to draw your attention to the unconscious habit. Aneela has had trichotillomania for 20+ years.

Keen Smart Bracelet

In this episode I chat with Aneela about her story, why not to compare your recovery to others, 99% recovery vs 100% recovery, anxiety, the Keen smart bracelet and the thinking behind it, improving awareness for compulsive hair pulling and skin picking, a breathing exercise for anxiety, and the TLC Foundation. Enjoy!


podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

You can also listen on Android and over devices through most podcast apps, such as Stitcher.

Continue Reading

OCD

Overcoming OCD is not a fight, is an act of love

Overcoming OCD is not a fight, is an act of love.

Hi,

My name is Marco. I come from Italy.

I struggled with OCD (pure O) since I was 10 years old. But I don’t want to start my story from there. I am sure most people reading have heard a million of times this story about dealing with intrusive thoughts, repetitive behaviors, counting and all the suffering and relative problematics this pathology leads to. I want to start this story from my favorite part: Recovery.

Two years ago I had the impression that overcoming OCD, for me, was impossible. Although OCD didn’t impair completely my social and professional life, I was at the mercy of a mind that when hit, hit very hard. I tried almost everything: since I was little I keep bouncing between psychologists and psychiatries but never did a real treatment that lasted more than a year. At the time of University I did more than 3 years of psychotherapy and then, completely unsatisfied by that, went to a psychiatrist whom treated me with meds for the following 6 years. At the same time I was doing behavior therapy. My experience with meds was pretty unsatisfying too as my feeling was that doctors were throwing darts into the night. I have to say also that I was particularly sensitive to meds and that I couldn’t reach high dosages without having strong side effects. Anyway, for sure the slight improvement for me wasn’t worth all the side effects.

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Podcast

Jon Hershfield and Shala Nicely – Everyday mindfulness for OCD

This week’s episode is sponsored by the Anxiety and Stress Disorders Institute of Maryland. If you are in the Baltimore area and are looking for treatment head over to http://anxietyandstress.com.

In episode 90 I interviewed Jon Hershfield and Shala Nicely. Jon Hershfield and Shala Nicely talked about their new book “Everyday mindfulness for OCD: Tips, Tricks, and Skills for Living Joyfully”.

Everyday mindfulness for OCD

In this episode I chat with Jon and Shala about mindfulness, meditation, the importance of self-compassion, a self-compassion coping statement, writing a new contract with OCD, the JOY acronym, the newspaper headline game, and silver linings. Enjoy!


podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

You can also listen on Android and over devices through most podcast apps, such as Stitcher.

Continue Reading

OCD

just another day and new realities

I have a pretty firm hope that the more I act the way I want to be, the more I’ll become exactly that.

The first time my OCD played a role in daily life was when I was in middle school. I was at a friend’s house and we were going to watch a movie. Before he was able to open to DVD case and put the disc into the player, I insisted that he wash his hands. I didn’t want to get anything from his hands on the case. Begrudgingly, he said OK and went to the bathroom. One of the worst episodes of OCD I’ve ever had was about a year ago. I was getting out of bed and checked my phone for the time. As soon as I tried putting the phone down, I felt off, worried, out of control and obsessed. I couldn’t stop touching it, moving it, pressing on the surface. After about ten minutes of this I went outside to catch my breath, though I knew I wasn’t finished with the compulsion. Out on that porch I began breathing heavier and quicker. I started sweating, even though it was a brisk day. I squinted my eyes and held my eyelids closed, trying to psych myself out of what I knew was coming. Then, panic attack time. I spent the next 30 minutes on the couch, listening to Guns N’ Roses, trying to will myself out of it. Nothing worked, though, which I knew would be the case. I just had to manage and ride it out.

The loose point to my OCD story is that you can always make it out to the other side. In the moment, you’ll never get any clarity. Nor will you find any solace. People close to me always try to remind me that I’m not crazy, I’m not the only one who experiences this stuff, and it’s not as bad as I think it is. None of those observations help. Or they don’t help me. I’ve had to find ways to deal with my OCD on my own, because, let’s face it, OCD is a very private thing. I, for one, am not quite embarrassed to show it to people, but I am very hesitant. The judging, confused eyes are unnecessary. And the fast, five cent “advice” from those who don’t have this disorder is often painful.

Wisdom from those who know nothing about a topic is rarely useful, and bordering on useless.

I write about, share on social media, and talk with others about various mental health issues because I want to. Because doing so sometimes sheds light on the issue. It sometimes erases just a bit of the stigma around certain ones. And it helps me sleep at night and function throughout the day; knowing I did my small part in informing, educating, or just plain sharing.

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OCD

90% better from OCD

Now, I consider myself 90 percent better from OCD.

I am 38 years old and have been suffering with OCD for the past 17 years. When I look back in retrospect on my teenage years, I now realize I had small signs of OCD back then. I remember that I was very obsessed with making my homework perfect and doing a whole math project in pencil and then instead of erasing a mistake I would redo the whole assignment. I remember having the fear that I wasn’t perfect and what people would think of me if I made a mistake. Fast forward to 17 years ago because that’s where my OCD really started to get extreme. The event that triggered my OCD was when my father had his heart attack and almost didn’t survive. I was 21 back then. I then began to get the intrusive thoughts that if I didn’t do something my father would die. For example, if I didn’t put the turning signal in when I made a turn I thought something bad would happen to him. If I put the radio on a bad number (which I have issues with numbers) I would think my father would be injured or fall ill. My whole daily life became surrounded by numerous obsessions and compulsions about my father being ok and focusing and doing everything “right” to keep him alive and safe. This went on for 15 years. I would text him repeatedly throughout the day to see if he was ok. I then, for a period of about a year, went to therapy. I was embarrassed to tell anyone that I was seeing a therapist due to my fear of that negative stigma that I’m so called crazy.

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