Podcast

Jon Hershfield – Overcoming Harm OCD

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In episode 153 of The OCD Stories podcast I interviewed Jon Hershfield. Jon is a psychotherapist who specialises in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder. He is the author four books and in this episode he talks about his new book “Overcoming Harm OCD: Mindfulness and CBT Tools for Coping with Unwanted Violent Thoughts”.

In this episode I chat with Jon about his new book, harm obsessions, how to identify mental compulsions, mindfulness, acceptance scripts and much much more. Hope it helps. 

podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

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Podcast

Story: Jo Edge

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In episode 152 of The OCD Stories podcast I interviewed Jo Edge. Jo kindly agreed to share her OCD story with us. It is raw, real and inspiring. 

Jo Edge

In this episode I chat with Jo about her OCD story, depression, separation anxiety, CBT therapy, learning to have hobbies, sleep, gratitude and a million other things. Hope it helps.

podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

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Podcast

Dr Russ Harris – The Happiness Trap

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In episode 151 of The OCD Stories podcast I interviewed Dr Russ Harris. Russ is a medical practitioner, author of the international best-selling book ‘The Happiness Trap’, and is an world-renowned trainer of Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT).

DR RUSS HARRIS

In this episode I chat with Russ about his therapy story, he demonstrates several exercises, we discuss the choice point, his book The Happiness Trap, living a value led life, applying ACT principals when feeling emotionally overwhelmed, and much much more. Hope it helps.

podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

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Podcast

Jessica Emily – Littlest Lady (Redefining Trauma, & OCD)

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In episode 150 of The OCD Stories podcast I interviewed Jessica Emily. Jessica is the creator of LittlesLady.com, and she’s kindly agreed to share her OCD and mental health story with us.

Littlest Lady - Jessica Emily

In this episode I chat with Jessica about her OCD story, abuse and trauma, therapy, her biggest epiphany in recovery, her work on LittlestLady.com, words of hope for those with OCD and experienced trauma. Hope it helps.

podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

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OCD

Questioning Yourself, and Hubristic Overthinking

When I was eighteen, I started this relationship with a plucky, punky, quite typically teenage angst fellow eighteen year-old. Like a lot of teenage relationships, it was a questionable match, we had little in common and it was short-lived, the pair of us calling it quits shortly before I moved away to London for university.

Coincidentally, brought on by the unfamiliar surroundings of a daunting new environment, and having moved four hundred miles away from my home town, it was in these initial months that OCD began making a cameo in my day-to-day life. By the start of my second year, it had a leading role in my story.

However, after a few years of reflection, it’s finally occurred to me that the source of my OCD was not solely a substantial social, or academic shift; the people we meet and the interactions we have with others through our “outside lives” play a huge part in how we process, perceive and think about ourselves in our “inside lives”.

Around two to three weeks before I moved away for uni, I get a text. It’s from a close friend, we’ve known each other for countless years throughout school and college, and she’d been encountering her own severe issues with mental health for a number of months. As a rule of thumb, if a friend with mental health problems contacts you at one o’clock in the morning and says that they’re feeling “a bit off”, you should give them your full, undivided attention. We agree to meet up the following evening to have a chat about what she’s going through, and after a few drinks, she makes a tipsy, ill-advised pass at me. I tell her that, even in my own woozy and blurred state, it’s a terrible idea, we both in turn laugh it off, and I leave.

The following morning, I woke up in what felt like it wasn’t my body.

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OCD

I am growing, and so are you – Finding beauty in OCD growth

My story makes me a little frustrated to think about, being that I didn’t get diagnosed until I was 19 years old.  I have struggled with cleanliness OCD, HOCD, harm OCD and currently ROCD.

I grew up doing all kinds of physical compulsions, but didn’t know it was OCD. For example, I would check under my bed and in my closet every single night until I was 14. I knew nothing/no one was in there, but for some reason I felt inclined to keep checking. There was something about the unknown of a door and a sheet that kept me checking. I went through a season where I would wash my hands so many times that they would bleed, and my parents had to make me wear gloves with Vaseline in them to stop the bleeding.  But these weren’t the things that made me think something might be wrong. They just seemed like normal kid things to me.

When I was in high school I always thought I was just too focused on what people thought of me, but in reality I was obsessing about it. I would get fearful of opinions, and go to great lengths to make sure people liked me or that they approved of what I was doing. I would spend hours every night scrolling through comments on Facebook, or tweets on Twitter to make sure no one was talking about me, even though there was no reason to.  I knew something was off. It was like I couldn’t stop. I knew other people worried about this kind of stuff, but for me it would get stuck. I knew it went way past the normal self-esteem issues, but I did nothing about it until I went to college. That’s where it escalated.

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Podcast

Elvis Gomes – Understanding experiences of OCD

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In episode 149 of The OCD Stories podcast I interviewed Elvis Gomes. He was on episode 15 where he shared his OCD story and talked about his experience on the TV show Switzerland’s Got Talent. He is now studying for his PhD at Queen Mary University of London.Queen Mary University OCD Study

In this episode I chat with Elvis about an update on his OCD story, he tells us about his PhD research in intrusive thoughts, how to get involved with the research, he shares the 11 misunderstandings around Homosexual themed OCD, his words of wisdom for people with OCD, what he’s learned about OCD since researching it and much much more. Hope it helps.

podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

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OCD

A human mental health issue

My parents shunned any type of conversation about sex. In fact, I have never seen my parents kiss even and probably saw them awkwardly hug a handful of times in my life. I lived a very sheltered upbringing. In fact, I’d purposely take off my contacts in High School health class so I wouldn’t see the board or occupy myself in a book in the back of the classroom. I didn’t want to know anything about sex. As a Muslim, Pakistani American born and raised in Connecticut and a Hijaabi (I wore the head scarf out of peer pressure from the girls at the Mosque) at the time, I had no intention of engaging in sex because it was shunned. Even at the mosque, we were separated from the men and if I saw a boy, I would lower my gaze and he’d do the same. My only interaction with boys were my cousins. And in Islam, we are allowed to  marry our cousins. When I hit puberty, I started falling for my cousin. I looked forward to weekend family gatherings just so we could chat. I felt intense emotions for him that I can still remember feeling. A handshake was everything. Perhaps this is why sex has been the biggest taboo and the biggest part of my OCD in my life.

When two lesbians were invited to be guest speakers in my 10th grade health class, I got curious. As I listened to them talk about coming out, it hit me. I looked at the girl sitting in front of me. She had a tight shirt on and her small waist looked beautiful. I fixated on that waist and it was my very first trigger into my HOCD. From that moment, the entire world flipped upside down, like I was really in the upside down (Stranger Things reference). Every woman, even my own mother made me spike. A spike is a strain in my body, like in my stomach and vagina (I still don’t know what it really is). My favorite Bollywood actresses made me spike. A beautiful voice singing, siri, an operator, the Doctor’s secretary all made me spike. What was going on? I was surrounded by women everyday and it felt like hell. I couldn’t look at them. I was analyzing them. Do I like them? Do I want to be with them? So I wanted to avoid them, isolating myself and wanting to stay home and not even go out in the world.

Before this, I only ever imagined to be with my male cousin. I thought I was in love with him. And this whole time I felt so alone, unable to express any of this to anyone. It was so embarrassing. So, I called a gay hotline that I found online and asked them what was going on with me and they made it even worse. Their triggering words were ‘You just haven’t let yourself like a girl yet, just try it.’ I remember playing badminton with my sister and suddenly fell to the floor in a massive panic attack. I told her everything. She comforted me, telling me that even she thinks about women sometimes. These words gave me ease. It was my first compulsion. I don’t remember when it disappeared but it did. Probably because my OCD content shifted to ‘weight OCD.’ I then fixated on my body. But I’ll get to that in a bit.

My HOCD came back in full force at 19. It was like the devil. I started googling ‘gay Muslims’ to find out if this was even okay as a Muslim. I found Faisal Alam, a gay Muslim activist who founded an organization for gay Muslims. I started to talk to a gay muslim man on Faisal’s forum group, and he told me that I wasn’t actually gay. Again, a sigh of momentary relief. I finally found a therapist. I don’t even know how I had the money for it. He was in Connecticut. He was an old white man. My first thought was, ‘how is an old white man going to understand a young, South Asian Muslim girl?’ I was so nervous that he’d tell me I was a lesbian and my life and my dreams of a husband and kids would be shattered. He gave me reassurance instead. He told me being gay or straight was a choice and that reassurance helped for a bit. I would continue seeking reassurance from him and he kept giving it to me, unable to truly resolve my real problem, OCD.

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Podcast

Kim Vincenty – A worried mother does better research than the FBI

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In episode 148 of The OCD Stories podcast I interviewed Kim Vincenty. Kim is Vice president of OCD Jacksonville, an IOCDF affiliate. She has worked alongside the clothing brand Natural life to create the fearless collection, a range of products that target stigma and fear of anxiety disorders – as well as raise money for OCD Jacksonville.

Kim Vincenty

In this episode I chat with Kim about being a parent of a child with OCD, running a support group for families, advice for parent’s of newly diagnosed children, advice for parental self-care, how a family can fight OCD together, OCD Jacksonville, the Natural Life “Fearless” collection and much much more. Hope it helps.

podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

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Podcast

Story: Robin Roblee-Strauss (What If?)

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In episode 147 of The OCD Stories podcast I interviewed Robin Roblee-Strauss who has kindly agreed to share his OCD story, and talk about his film “What if?”.

Robin Roblee-Strauss

In this episode I chat with Robin about his OCD story, separation anxiety, the power of hearing other peoples stories, therapy, goals and values, journaling, finding the right therapist and his documentary “What if”. Hope it helps.

podcast

To listen on iTunes click the button, or go to iTunes and search “The OCD Stories“. If you enjoy the podcast please subscribe and leave a review. It helps us reach more people who need to hear these remarkable stories of recovery!

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